Auto Enrolment Earnings

I have been asked what the levels of auto enrolment earnings are that mean an employer has to set up a qualifying auto enrolment pension scheme.

Auto Enrolment Earnings

Although an employer does not have to automatically enrol employees earning less than the earning trigger for auto enrolment, an employee can choose to opt in.

Typically, a pub or café may have no employees earning above the auto enrolment earnings trigger of £10,000 per year.

However, they can choose to opt in and the small employer is burdened by additional employee costs and professional fees processing their payroll and auto enrolment obligations. See my post Auto Enrolment Burden on Small Businesses

Auto Enrolment Earnings and Employee Ages for Eligibility

The Three Employee Categories

Entitled Worker

  • Aged 16 to 74
  • Earn less than the qualifying lower earnings threshold of £5,824 a year (£486 per month or £112 per week)
  • An employer does not have to automatically enrol ‘entitled workers’. If the employee decides to opt in, the employer does not have to contribute to their pension fund.

Non-Eligible Jobholder

  • Aged 16 to 74
  • Earns more than £5,824 a year (£486 per month or £112 per week) but no more than £10,000 a year (£833 per month or £192 per week)

Other non-eligible jobholders:

  • Aged 16 to 21 or between State Pension age and 74
  • Earn more than £10,000 per year (£833 per month or £192 per week)

The employer does not have to automatically enrol ‘non-eligible’ jobholders. If the employee decides to opt in, the employer must contribute to their pension fund.

Eligible Jobholder

  • Aged between 22 and State Pension age
  • Earns more than £10,000 per year (£833 per month or £192 per week)

The employer must automatically enrol ‘eligible’ jobholders and contribute to their pension fund unless the employee decides to opt out.

Disclaimer

The above is not exhaustive and is for guidance only and you should consult your accountant or other professional adviser before taking action on any of the above. See the Disclaimer

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