Category Archives: Payroll Auto Enrolment

Keep Onside with Auto-Enrolment

Retirement NestEgg

Keep on-side with the Pensions Regulator and ensure you cover all the due diligence required for auto-enrolment.

As Auto-Enrolment for small businesses draws ever closer to being a reality I, in conjunction with my accountancy Institute, have linked up with the multi award winning Henry Tapper and his team at The Pension Playpen to help clients through the Auto-Enrolment Due Diligence maze.

Henry and his team will cover all the due diligence necessary to work out which staff are Eligible or Non-eligible, they will provide a report of all the workplace pension providers that will offer you a scheme and finally they will provide all the necessary Certificates and Reports that will prove to the Regulator and the STAFF that the scheme complies and that you have made the choice in a correct manner.

One important point to remember is that it is not just the Pensions Regulator that employers are answerable to it is also their staff who have a right to expect that their contributions are being safeguarded and that the choice of the pension provider has been made in a correct way and not just based on cost or ease of use.

The Dales Accountancy Service – Payroll Bureau

If you use my payroll bureau service, my systems are ready for auto-enrolment. I will also happily assess your workforce for free if you are a client (doing your own payroll or using my payroll bureau) as required in stage two of the auto-enrolment compliance below.

Planning for Auto-Enrolment

One – Register with the Pensions Regulator

It is important that you nominate someone from your organisation to be the main point of contact on all auto-enrolment matters. The primary contact must be the most senior person within your organisation.  A secondary contact will be the person responsible for implementing auto-enrolment.

Two – Assess your workforce

If you have staff on PAYE it is very likely that you will have to enrol at least some of them. Use The Pension Playpen’s free Workforce Assessment to see how your workforce is divided between Eligible jobholders, Non-eligible jobholders and Entitled workers and the cost of contributions into the scheme for each category. All these calculations are done for you and all you need to do is input some basic data into their system. Should you then decide to proceed with Pension Playpen’s ‘Choose a Pension’ service this data will be pre-loaded. Note that all of your information which Pension Playpen hold will remain secure and fully confidential.

If you wish to assess your workforce yourself for free register with The Pension Playpen

Three – Choose a pension

Pension Playpen have researched the market for workplace pensions and considered the differing requirements of each pension provider. Their system analyses your data and will quickly match you with those workplace pension providers willing to offer you a scheme. There is a charge for this service but you only need pay after we have confirmed how many providers are willing to offer you a quote.

Please note that if you are a Dales Accountancy Service client the charge is substantially discounted due to the volume that my Institute and it’s members put through, so please talk to me to get your discount code.

This can be done through The Pension Playpen

Four – Integrate your payroll

Setting up auto-enrolment into a new pension scheme might lead to other complications like integration with your payroll systems or with the providers own systems used to manage contributions. These issues are best addressed early on. Pension Playpen will help you with the questions you need to ask of your payroll system provider and chosen pension provider.

The Dales Accountancy Service payroll bureau system integrates with most pension providers.

Five – Auto-enrolment compliance

You can use Pension Playpen’s service to choose a pension with no obligation to purchase a scheme from your chosen provider. After you have chosen a scheme they will give you a package of reports and an Actuarial Certificate to confirm that your chosen scheme will comply with the rules and regulations for auto-enrolment and minimum terms required by the Regulator.

This can be done through The Pension Playpen

Six – Implementation and beyond

Auto-enrolment does not finish once you have made your first contribution. You will need to continue to pay regular contributions into the pension scheme, monitor the age and earnings of all staff and any new staff joining, process any opt-in, joining or opt-out requests, keep and maintain accurate records and re-enrol every three years.  Once your systems have been set up this will need to operate just like real-time PAYE and as part of your usual business process.

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Auto Enrolment Earnings

I have been asked what the levels of auto enrolment earnings are that mean an employer has to set up a qualifying auto enrolment pension scheme.

Auto Enrolment Earnings

Although an employer does not have to automatically enrol employees earning less than the earning trigger for auto enrolment, an employee can choose to opt in.

Typically, a pub or café may have no employees earning above the auto enrolment earnings trigger of £10,000 per year.

However, they can choose to opt in and the small employer is burdened by additional employee costs and professional fees processing their payroll and auto enrolment obligations. See my post Auto Enrolment Burden on Small Businesses

Auto Enrolment Earnings and Employee Ages for Eligibility

The Three Employee Categories

Entitled Worker

  • Aged 16 to 74
  • Earn less than the qualifying lower earnings threshold of £5,824 a year (£486 per month or £112 per week)
  • An employer does not have to automatically enrol ‘entitled workers’. If the employee decides to opt in, the employer does not have to contribute to their pension fund.

Non-Eligible Jobholder

  • Aged 16 to 74
  • Earns more than £5,824 a year (£486 per month or £112 per week) but no more than £10,000 a year (£833 per month or £192 per week)

Other non-eligible jobholders:

  • Aged 16 to 21 or between State Pension age and 74
  • Earn more than £10,000 per year (£833 per month or £192 per week)

The employer does not have to automatically enrol ‘non-eligible’ jobholders. If the employee decides to opt in, the employer must contribute to their pension fund.

Eligible Jobholder

  • Aged between 22 and State Pension age
  • Earns more than £10,000 per year (£833 per month or £192 per week)

The employer must automatically enrol ‘eligible’ jobholders and contribute to their pension fund unless the employee decides to opt out.

Disclaimer

The above is not exhaustive and is for guidance only and you should consult your accountant or other professional adviser before taking action on any of the above. See the Disclaimer

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Auto-Enrolment Burden on Small Businesses

Auto-Enrolment

The Auto-Enrolment burden of workplace pensions will be forced on even the smallest business between now and the end of 2017.

Auto-enrolment sounds great, “we’re in” rings from the TV publicity. But it can be heart ache for small businesses that can ill afford such a financial burden.

For career politicians that have never had a proper job, it’s fabulous to come up with these great ideas to encourage pension savings. This perhaps opens up an opportunity for the Government to release it’s State pension responsibilities in the future and pass that responsibility onto employers.

Indeed, for small one person businesses, it can well discourage them to expand and take on their first employee.

Let’s look at the costs for both the employee and employer:

By law you must pay at least the minimum employer contribution in the last column above with the employee making up the difference between that figure and the total minimum contribution in column 2.

I have defined ‘qualifying earnings’, ‘total pay’ and ‘basic pay’ further down this post.

Let us look at a scenario of a small business with one employee earning £288 basic pay for a 40 hour week (£7.20 an hour National Living Wage). The following table shows the minimum annual contributions that have to be paid:

On op of the employer contribution, the business owner will also have to pay the costs of running auto-enrolment. Unless they do it themselves and risk heavy penalties, they will have to use a payroll bureau. Most, if not all, payroll bureaus will insist on doing both the normal payroll and auto-enrolment as one without the other is destined for disaster!

So, a small employer with one weekly paid employee forced into using a payroll bureau because of auto-enrolment may incur the following typical additional costs:

Payroll processing at £16.50 per week plus £22.00 year end processing = Total £880.00 per year

Auto-enrolment processing £31.50 per month = £378.00

Total costs before any contribution to Auto-Enrolment pension scheme £1,258.00

What goes into the pension fund based on employee working 40 hours a week at 7.20 (£14,976 PA):

Annually up to Sept 2017 – £449.28

Annually up to Sept 2018 – £898.56

Annually from October 2018 – £1,347.84

You do the sums, it costs the employer nearly as much in extra overhead after October 2018 as goes into the pension pot.

There may also be a £35 or more set-up fee for each employee and some pension providers like The Peoples Pension are charging the employer a £500 set-up fee. I know NEST Pensions are not making a set-up charge to employers yet. With set-up charges, ongoing processing charges etc, small employers are being hammered with extra employment costs many cannot afford.

Possible extra burden for the small employer with one weekly paid full-time employee on National Living Wage after October 2018 is £1,857 before set-up costs and all that goes into the employees pension scheme from the employer (before pension fund management charges) is £599. It costs the small employer with one employee as above £1,258 more than the employer contributes.

This really is a true burden on small businesses.

Let’s define the terms ‘qualifying earnings’, ‘total pay’ and ‘basic pay’:

Qualifying earnings’ is the name for a band of earnings you can use to calculate pension contributions. For the 2016/17 tax year, it’s all an employee’s earnings between £5,824 and £43,000.

Total pay’ means all payments made to a worker, including their salary/wages, plus any commission, bonuses, overtime and so on.

Basic pay’ means a worker’s salary/wages and statutory payments like sickness and maternity pay, but it excludes commission, bonuses, overtime and so on.

Employers and employees can pay more than the minimum contribution but the upper limit depends on your pension fund provider.

For more information on what you need to contribute, visit The Pensions Regulator relevant web page.

Disclaimer

The above is not exhaustive and is for guidance only and you should consult your accountant or other professional adviser before taking action on any of the above. See the Disclaimer

 

 

 

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Auto Enrolment Staging Date

Retirement NestEgg

It is important to find out your pension auto enrolment staging date (start date) as early as possible to plan for the start.

Employers that had PAYE schemes before 1 April, 2012 can find their start date by entering your PAYE reference on the Pensions Regulator finding your staging date site page.

If you are a new employer and got a PAYE reference after 1 April, 2012 your staging date can be found from the table below:

Staging dates for employers who set up after 1 April 2012

Date PAYE income first payable Staging date
Between 1 April 2012 and 31 March 2013 1 May 2017
Between 1 April 2013 and 31 March 2014 1 July 2017
Between 1 April 2014 and 31 March 2015 1 August 2017
Between 1 April 2015 and 31 December 2015 1 October 2017
Between 1 January 2016 and 30 September 2016 1 November 2017
Between 1 October 2016 and 30 June 2017 1 January 2018
Between 1 July 2017 and 30 September 2017 1 February 2018

Remember, before taking action based on any part of this post, please seek advice from your accountant or payroll bureau.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Auto-Enrolment 21 Point Employer Checklist

Direct Debit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here is another useful Auto-Enrolment 21 point employer checklist and you can download it at the bottom of the page:

Download (PDF, Unknown)

See also:

Workplace Pension Auto-Enrolment page

It is important to seek advice from your accountant, payroll bureau and IFA before taking action on the contents of this checklist.

 

 

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Single Director Companies & Auto Enrolment

If you have a limited company and you are the only director/shareholder with no other employees, HMRC will be sending you a letter at some point to explain your situation regarding pension auto-enrolment.

The letter is aimed at single director companies and explains that as you are only paying yourself, and you do not have any other workers, you are exempt from auto-enrolment.

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IRIS AE Suite for Auto Enrolment

See how Iris KashFlow payroll can help you comply with workplace pension automatic enrolment legislation with the IRIS AE Suite. This complete solution includes assessment, required employee communication and P60 publishing and electronic distribution.

We use IRIS KashFlow payroll for our clients and will be bringing in the IRIS AE Suite for our clients. Click the link below to see a short 3 minute overview:

IRIS AE Suite Overview

For other payroll tutorials and information click KashFlow Payroll Tutorial’s

 

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Pension Auto Enrolment Part 3

This is the final part of our brief guide to Pension Auto Enrolment. If you have not read previous parts then click Part 1 Part 2

What do you need to contribute?

The minimum contributions rate must be at least 8% of the employees’ ‘qualifying earnings’ by 2018, with employers picking up at least 3% of that amount. You can phase in the cost of your employer duties up until 2018, which is designed to help you manage the impact on your cash flow.

‘Qualifying earnings’ are a band of earnings from £5,772 to £41,865 (figures for 2014/15 tax year). These earnings include:

  • salary
  • wage
  • overtime
  • bonuses
  • commission
  • statutory sick pay
  • statutory maternity pay
  • ordinary or additional statutory paternity pay
  • statutory adoption pay

As an alternative to using the qualifying earnings definition, you can choose to use ‘certification’. A certificate can cover all workers or groups of workers.

Getting it right – the process you should follow

As stated previously, we recommend you start your scheme set up process at least 12 months before your staging date. This is based on feedback from many large employers who have already  been through Auto Enrolment and stated that in reality they needed 12 months to go through the different stages effectively.

Of course, we along with our financial adviser associates, can do a lot of this legwork for you and provide you with expert guidance throughout the process.

Small businesses will only in reality need 6-8 months, but the longer the time, the more choices you have.

The process starting 12 months before start date:

Step 1 – Identify your staging date

When is you firm being auto enrolled? Do you need to bring the date forward to fit in with your business calendar?

Ask your accountant or payroll bureau for the date and we highly recommend you start the process 12 months before this date.

Step 2 – Pension scheme

What’s right for one employer may not be right for another. Do you just want to meet the minimum requirements or do you want a pension scheme that is the right fit for your business? If you already have a company pension scheme, does it meet the requirements?

Are you going to seek advice from your accountant in conjunction with experts in the financial adviser field to make sure you get it right?

Bear in mind that a pension is part of your benefits package so could be used to attract the right calibre of employees.

The process starting 8 months before start date:

Step 3 – Assess your workforce

Not all employees are eligible for Auto Enrolment – make sure you know who is and also which group of people are eligible to opt-in if they wish (see part 2 section entitled ‘Which employees are eligible’).

You may need to ‘clean’ your data to make sure you can manage the different groups and communicate with them effectively.

The process starting 6 months before start date:

Stage 4 – Communications strategy

Make sure you give your employees the right information at the right time, taking into account the different groups they fall into.

You should communicate with them throughout the process and make sure they know their rights and what your pension scheme will look like.

Stage 5 – IT systems

How are you going to manage the scheme, taking into account joiners and leavers?

How does the software integrate with payroll systems?

The process starting 4-5 months before start date:

Stage 6 – Test processes

Analyse cost implications and changes to your processes. Make any necessary changes to your existing scheme and test everything to make sure you are fully ready and are meeting the detailed requirements set by the Pensions Regulator.

The process from going live from start date:

Stage 7 – Scheme set up

Carry out all your duties and start auto enrolling your employees.

Register with the Pensions Regulator within 5 months after your staging (start) date.

Stage 8 – On-going management of your scheme

Carry out all your on-going duties, including management of the ‘eligible’, ‘non-eligible’ and ‘entitled’ workers (remember they could move from one group to another), as well as employee leavers and joiners.

regularly review your pension – is it fit for purpose?

Re-register with the Pensions Regulator every 3 years.

 

What happens if you don’t meet your Auto Enrolment requirements?

The Pensions Regulator has the power to investigate firms who it believes are not meeting the requirements and issue penalties for non-compliance (see Part 2).

Large employers have already gone through the Auto Enrolment process and the Pensions Regulator indicated that it is investigating over 500 of them about their compliance with the legislation and may take enforcement action regarding non-compliance.

The financial penalties for non-compliance are significant but it also serves to highlight the complexity of complying with the legislation.

Remember, even if you have a limited company and you are the only employee, Auto Enrolment still affects you and you business.

 

Help is out there

At the Dales Accountancy Service, our payroll software is ready for Auto enrolment and can link with pension providers and the Pensions Regulator on behalf of our payroll clients.

We are also linking up with Whiteleaf Financial Plc who provided the content for this 3 part guide to Auto Enrolment to ensure clients meet their obligations without penalty.

A good financial services provider with an expert knowledge of Auto Enrolment can take the pain out of meeting your Auto Enrolment duties.

Key benefits to look for in a financial services provider for your Auto enrolment obligations:

  • Fit for purpose pension scheme that meets the requirements of Auto Enrolment. This includes reviewing your existing pemsion scheme (if applicable).
  • Expert guidance and assistance through the different stages of pension scheme set up (including communication/presentations to your employees).
  • Access to HR systems – to be used by you and employees
  • On-going support and management of your scheme
  • Detailed annual report of the scheme

 

What next?

I hope you found this 3 part series of interest and further information will be provided through this blog in future. If you  require further information please contact your accountant and financial services provider.

A PDF of Whiteleaf Financial’s brochure on which this 3 part series was based is available for download here Automatic Enrolment Brochure

Back to Part 2 Part 1

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Pension Auto Enrolment Part 2

Go back to Part 1

Why do you need help with pension Auto Enrolment?

Complying with Auto Enrolment is not a straight forward process to implement and it can take 12 months to work through the detailed pension scheme requirements. It’s not surprising when you consider that, in addition to a review of pension arrangements, it involves reviews and analysis of payroll systems, employee categories, IT systems, Terms and Conditions of employment, and various HR policies.

It’s not just time though. An announcement from the Pensions Regulator indicated that it is investigating over 500 of employers which have already been through the process about their compliance with the legislation and has indicated that it may take enforcement action regarding non-compliance. The financial penalties for non-compliance are significant but it also serves to highlight the complexity of complying with the legislation.

As referred to above, the Pensions Regulator can issue penalty notices to punish persistent and deliberate non-compliance.

A fixed penalty notice will be issued if the employer does not comply with statutory notices, or if there’s sufficient evidence of a breach of the law. This is fixed at £400 and payable within a specific period.

The Pensions Regulator can also issue an escalating penalty notice for failure to comply with a statutory notice. This penalty has a prescribed daily rate of £50 to £10,000 depending on the number of staff the employer has.

They can issue a civil penalty for cases where employers fail to pay contributions due. This is a financial penalty of up to £5,000 for individuals and up to £50,000 for organisations.

Where employers fail to comply with a compliance notice or there is evidence of a breach, the Pensions Regulator can issue a prohibited recruitment conduct penalty notice. This penalty has a prescribed rate of £1,000 to £5,000 depending on the number of staff the employer has. They aim to fully recover all the penalties that they issue.

Questions you need to ask yourself :

  • Have you chosen a pension scheme yet?
  • What software are you going to use to manage your scheme, ensuring leavers and joiners are catered for?
  • How will it work with your payroll processes and software?
  • Which of your workforce will need to be automatically enrolled?
  • Which of your workforce can request to join your pension scheme?
  • How will you communicate with your staff?
  • What help can be provided by your accountant and other professionals to help you meet all the requirements of Auto Enrolment and ensure you’re compliant?

Which employees are eligible?

There are three different categories of workers, defined by their age and how much they earn.

1. Eligible employees are people who:

  •  work or ordinarily work in the UK;
  • are aged between 22 to State pension age inclusive;
  • earn £10,000 p.a. or over (based on 2014/15 tax year).

These people are eligible to join the scheme but do have the freedom to opt out.

2. Non-eligible employees are people who:

  • work or ordinarily work in the UK;
  • are aged 16-74 (inclusive);
  • earn between £5,772 to £10,000 p.a. inclusive (based on 2014/15 tax year).

or

  •  earn above £10,000 and are under 22 or are over the State pension age.

These people can opt-in to the schemeif they choose to do so.

3. Entitled workers are people who:

  • work or ordinarily work in the UK;
  • are aged between 16 and 74 (inclusive);
  • earn £5,772 or less (based on 2014/15 tax year).

These people can join the scheme but the employer does not have to make contributions.

What is NEST?

NEST (National Employment Savings Trust) is a pension scheme that you can use tomeet your employer duties. It’s a simple, low cost option that’s primarily aimed at low to medium earners that don’t have access to a company pension scheme.

We highly recommend you get expert financial advice and take a look at other options before proceeding with NEST.

Your Requirements

Your employer duties will depend on the types of worker as identified above.

Summary of employer duties for an ‘eligible worker’ (1. above):

  • Enrol them into an Auto Enrolment scheme
  • Make contributions
  • Set up and manage process for employees to opt-out
  • Keep robust records

Summary of employer duties for a ‘non-eligible worker’ (2. above):

  • Provide effective communication on your scheme and their rights to opt-in
  • If requested, arrange scheme membership and make contributions
  • Set up and manage process for employees to opt-out
  • Continually assess individuals in this group – they may become eligible e.g. age and earnings
  • Keep robust records

Summary of employer duties for an ‘entitled worker’ (3. above):

  • Provide effective communication on your scheme and their rights to opt-in
  • If requested, arrange scheme membership and make contributions (only applicable if you choose to make employer contributions)
  • Deduct contributions from their salary and pay into the scheme
  • Continually assess individuals in the group – they may move into the eligible or non-eligible groups at a later date
  • Keep robust records

Go back to Part 1

Go forward to Part 3

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Pension Auto Enrolment Part 1

Pension Auto Enrolment is a hot topic at the moment and many thousands of employers have received a letter from the Pensions Regulator detailing their Auto Enrolment requirements. This is part 1 of a 3 part guide on the subject.

The Pension Auto Enrolment requirements can be a real headache for employers, however, the good news is that The Dales Accountancy Service can offer their clients a solution that enables employers to meet their Pension Auto Enrolment obligations without fear.

Pension Auto Enrolment:

  • What does it mean?
  • What do you have to do?
  • How do you do it?
  • How much will it cost?
  • Where do you start?

To start with, it is important you know exactly what you want to achieve; whether it’s just compliance and meeting your duties or you want to add value by providing more than the minimum requirements. The answer to this question might be different for separate groups of employees.

You can’t avoid the legislation. The reality is that just like PAYE, VAT and National Insurance, Auto Enrolment is another compliance requirement you will need to deal with and, like the other compliance requirements, there are punitive fines if you don’t.

Chances are you will need help:

  • Help to understand what the legislation requires you to do;
  • Help to understand the options you have;
  • Help to assess the costs of Auto enrolment and how to minimise those costs;
  • Help to assess your current arrangements and resources to see how they can be utilised to meet your obligations;
  • Help to put together your solution;
  • Help to deliver your solution to make you compliant both at your staging (start) date and on an on-going basis.

We, together with our financial adviser associates, can provide a solution that will help you pro-actively deal with your forthcoming obligations, establish a straightforward project plan and turn what could be problematic into a manageable, efficient and undisruptive process.

Most of all, we and our financial adviser associates can reduce the distraction of Auto Enrolment to your business, reduce cost and resources that would need to be applied if you were doing it yourself, and give you the assurance you will be compliant.

In part 2 we answer the questions “Why do we need help with Auto Enrolment?” and “Which employees are eligible?”

 

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Get Ready for Pension Auto-Enrolment

Within 36 month’s, all employers will have to automatically enrol workers into a workplace pension scheme if they

  • are aged between 22 and State Pension age
  • earn more than £9,440 a year
  • work in UK

This is called ‘automatic enrolment’. Some small employers may already offer a workplace pension scheme even if the business does not make contributions. Under pension Auto-Enrolment, the employer will have to make contributions by law into a pension scheme for their eligible employees.

Enrolment is being phased in and larger firms of 250 or more employees have already had to comply. Between 1 April 2014 and 1 April 2015 employers with 50 to 249 employees will also have to comply.

For smaller businesses the phasing in will be as follows:

  • Employers with 30 to 49 employees – required to Auto-enrol their employees in a pension scheme between 1 August 2015 and 1 October 2015
  • Employers with fewer than 30 employees – required to Auto-enrol their employees in a pension scheme between 1 January 2016 and 1 April 2017

The start date for some businesses may seem a long way off, but it will soon be time to start writing your action plan and to plan changes in payroll systems if pension deductions are to be made from employees’ pay.

The amounts that are paid into the scheme are:

Up to 30 September 2017 – Employers pay a minimum of 1% of gross salary and employees 1%

1 October 2017 to 30 September 2018 – Employers pay a minimum of 2% of gross salary and employees 3%

1 October 2018 onwards – Employers pay a minimum of 3% of gross salary and employees 5%

Note that although Automatic enrolment only applies to employees earning over £9,440, those earning between £5,668 and £9,440 still have a right to opt in. Those earning less than £5,668 have a right to join a pension scheme.

Now is a good time to ask your accountant or payroll adviser for the date you will have to register and operate pension Auto-Enrolment (your ‘staging date’). You should also seek advice from your financial adviser and accountant/payroll bureau and start your action plan.

This blog should not be regarded as offering a complete explanation of the subject matter and therefore you should seek professional advice before taking any action or non-action based on it.

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